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Today's Handout - De File
Does Collecting Make You Feel Dirty?
cbertsch
cbertsch
Today's Handout
Here's what I'm distributing to my English 380 "Literary Analysis" course this afternoon:
Terms To Know For Film Unit
take
shot (two definitions)
raw footage
stock footage*
scene*
sequence*
cut
frame
24 frames per second
editing
montage (two definitions)
continuity editing vs. discontinuity editing*
establishing shot*
pan vs. tilt
racking focus*
tracking shot
mise-en-scène*
story vs. plot*
diegesis
diegetic sound vs. non-diegetic sound

taking an inventory
STEP ONE: observation and STEP TWO: analysis
textual evidence
inductive vs. deductive approach*

sine qua non


NOTE: * = Those terms we have yet to cover in class
Several years ago, I added a film unit to this course, which I have taught in all but a few of my semesters at the University of Arizona. Part of the reason is that many of our majors go on to take one or more film-related courses. But I also realized that learning to reflect seriously on film is a great way to improve one's writing. Students who fail to grasp the importance of editing before my film unit come away from it with the understanding that a good paper is rarely written in one piece, from start to finish, but is, rather, the product of a lot of time in the editing suite. It's necessary to rearrange one's material, to labor over the transition between sections and, in most cases, to leave a good deal of content on the cutting room floor. In fact, the analogy I make between filmmaking and paper-writing has proven so helpful that I now begin the course with the film unit. Doing so allows students to focus on classroom time instead of getting overburdened with reading in the hectic first few weeks. And, if all goes well, it also gives them a way to conceptualize the work they'll be doing in the course.

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Comments
From: e4q Date: September 12th, 2007 06:29 pm (UTC) (LINK TO SPECIFIC ENTRY)
i love the phrase mise-en-scène, and also i like denouement.
cbertsch From: cbertsch Date: September 12th, 2007 08:02 pm (UTC) (LINK TO SPECIFIC ENTRY)
You must like French connections, then! I wish I could figure out how to make the backwards accent thingie by simply typing.
From: e4q Date: September 12th, 2007 08:32 pm (UTC) (LINK TO SPECIFIC ENTRY)
i like the names for them as well, acute & grave that one is grave pron. grahv. i have forgotten the name for the little hut roof one.

é happens when i hit the Alt Gr key at the right of the space bar of my keyboard - those things are in there somewhere...
cbertsch From: cbertsch Date: September 12th, 2007 09:58 pm (UTC) (LINK TO SPECIFIC ENTRY)
I can't figure out the grave. Wait, let me see. Option + ` + E?:

è

. Voilá!
From: e4q Date: September 12th, 2007 10:14 pm (UTC) (LINK TO SPECIFIC ENTRY)
well done, you are rocking and rolling now! and don't forget the humble cedilla. and you win big prizes if you can find that one...

cbertsch From: cbertsch Date: September 13th, 2007 01:08 am (UTC) (LINK TO SPECIFIC ENTRY)
That would be an option-C:

ççççççççççççç

I always enjoy that one.
From: e4q Date: September 13th, 2007 07:17 am (UTC) (LINK TO SPECIFIC ENTRY)
::gasps aloud::

(and don't think i am forgetting the umlaut, which i also have a lot of time for, and what a word to roll around the mouth! umlaut umlaut umlaut)
cbertsch From: cbertsch Date: September 13th, 2007 03:37 pm (UTC) (LINK TO SPECIFIC ENTRY)
Ich liebe die Umlaut! Ich verwende sie um meine Glückheit laut zu läuten.
From: e4q Date: September 13th, 2007 03:45 pm (UTC) (LINK TO SPECIFIC ENTRY)

intrigued!

simultaneous translation svp!
cbertsch From: cbertsch Date: September 13th, 2007 04:06 pm (UTC) (LINK TO SPECIFIC ENTRY)

Re: intrigued!

"I love the umlaut. I use it in order to intone my happiness loudly." But the fun of the pun is entirely lost in translation. The German Laut means "sound" as a noun, but the identically spelled adjective laut means "loud." Läuten, as a transitive verb means to ring or otherwise elicit sound from, hence "intone." The word Umlaut is made of the noun Laut and the prefix "um", which, as a preposition coupled with "zu", means "in order to." An Umlaut is a noun specifying, roughly, "that which is used in order to make a particular sound," which is what umlauts are used for.
From: e4q Date: September 13th, 2007 04:13 pm (UTC) (LINK TO SPECIFIC ENTRY)

Re: intrigued!

cool beans!

i knew it was worth asking!
cbertsch From: cbertsch Date: September 14th, 2007 01:26 am (UTC) (LINK TO SPECIFIC ENTRY)

Re: intrigued!

I'm always happy to go German on anyone's ass!
kolakoski From: kolakoski Date: September 12th, 2007 11:27 pm (UTC) (LINK TO SPECIFIC ENTRY)
I love to see diegetic v. non-diegetic sound on the list. I tried to emphasize those elements in the summer version of 300 this year. The list (which I stole from grad students who taught the course before me) that I distributed is similar to yours posted here; but admittedly, mine was missing sequence, raw v. stock footage, and story v. plot...that is, until now.
cbertsch From: cbertsch Date: September 13th, 2007 01:09 am (UTC) (LINK TO SPECIFIC ENTRY)
I do montage-heavy documentaries, so the raw vs. stock is important. I hand them out a glossary of film terms derived -- I think that's the word, though Walter Benjamin might have other ideas -- from one of those overpriced film textbooks. I can give you a, a, a-- an original.
kolakoski From: kolakoski Date: September 13th, 2007 10:02 pm (UTC) (LINK TO SPECIFIC ENTRY)
Would love one. When is a good time to stop by your office these days?
cbertsch From: cbertsch Date: September 14th, 2007 01:26 am (UTC) (LINK TO SPECIFIC ENTRY)
Wednesdays, generally. 10am-11:45am I tend to be there. And my office hours are 2-3:30pm.
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