Charlie Bertsch (cbertsch) wrote,
Charlie Bertsch
cbertsch

There Will Be Blood For Oil

It shouldn't surprise me when someone like Bill Moyers clambers up onto the bandwagon, but I'm still taken aback by the bluntness with which he restates an argument that was once dismissed as left-wing conspiracy theory at its most irrational:
Let's go back a few years to the 1990's, when private citizen Dick Cheney was running Halliburton, the big energy supplier. That's when he told the oil industry that, "By 2010 we will need on the order of an additional fifty million barrels a day. So where is the oil going to come from? While many regions of the world offer great oil opportunities, the Middle East, with two-thirds of the world's oil and the lowest cost, is still where the prize ultimately lies."

Fast forward to Cheney's first heady days in the White House. The oil industry and other energy conglomerates were handed backdoor keys to the White House, and their CEO's and lobbyists were trooping in and out for meetings with their old pal, now Vice President Cheney. The meetings were secret, conducted under tight security, but as we reported five years ago, among the documents that turned up from some of those meetings were maps of oil fields in Iraq - and a list of companies who wanted access to them. The conservative group Judicial Watch and the Sierra Club filed suit to try to find out who attended the meetings and what was discussed, but the White House fought all the way to the Supreme Court to keep the press and public from learning the whole truth.

Think about it. These secret meetings took place six months before 9/11, two years before Bush and Cheney invaded Iraq. We still don't know what they were about. What we know is that this is the oil industry that's enjoying swollen profits these days. It would be laughable if it weren't so painful to remember that their erstwhile cheerleader for invading Iraq - the press mogul Rupert Murdoch - once said that a successful war there would bring us $20-a-barrel oil. The last time we looked, it was more than $140 a barrel. Where are you, Rupert, when the facts need checking and the predictions are revisited?
I wish John Dos Passos's anarchist sympathies hadn't hardened into anti-Communism. More importantly, I wish he weren't dead, since the time is ripe for an update of The Big Money. I know, I know: Rush already performed that service. As fondly as I recall my teenage devotion to Neil Peart, though, I think a more extensive and timely postmodernization is in order.
Tags: autobiography, media, music, politics
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